Amphibians and Reptiles of Long Island,
Staten Island and Manhattan


Species Extirpated from the Region


48. Northern Cricket Frog - Acris crepitans
This is a very small frog that is brown with stripes on legs and green spotting. Formerly found on L.I. and S.I. in wetland habitats. It is now listed as "Threatened" by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.  ANY SIGHTINGS OF THIS SPECIES SHOULD BE REPORTED TO THE NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION.

This species may still exist in very isolated pockets on Long Island and Staten Island.
 
 

49. Timber Rattlesnake - Crotalus horridus
This species was L.I.ís only front fanged venomous snake. There are many historical records of this snakes presence here until the turn of the century. It is listed as "Threatened" by the New York Department of Environmental Conservation. In the 19th and early 20th centuries the government encouraged the slaughter of this rare and valuable species until the point where it vanished completely from our area.  ANY SIGHTINGS OF THIS SPECIES SHOULD BE REPORTED TO THE NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION.

50. Bog Turtle - Clemmys muhlenbergii

This species was originally found on S.I. It is now listed by the Federal Government as "Endangered". This species requires bogs and wetland habitats. On Staten Island most of what used to be bog turtle habitat has been drained and altered for human use. It is a small turtle with a brown carapace and bright orange patches behind hind.  ANY SIGHTINGS OF THIS SPECIES SHOULD BE REPORTED TO THE NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION.

51. Wood Turtle - Clemmys insculpta
Description: 5-9" (12.7-23 cm). This species has a rough brown shell with "pyramid-like" projects jutting outward from the carapace scutes. Plastron yellow. Limbs and neck bright orange. Very long tail.  ANY SIGHTINGS OF THIS SPECIES SHOULD BE REPORTED TO THE NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION.

Similar species in our area: NONE.

Lifestyle: This species may have been native to our entire area, but became extinct as development destroyed most of this speciesí habitat. Many introduced individuals have been found on L.I. since then, but they probably have not re-established themselves as breeding populations.  This species is very rare and is listed by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation as a "Species of Special Concern". This species inhabits cool streams in forests and woodlands. Also spends much time on land. Mates Early spring and lays 6-8 1 5/8" eggs in May to June.

Young hatch September and October at 1 1/8 to 1 5/5/8". Young look like adults. Eggs laid on land in nest.

52. Upland Chorus Frog - Pseudacris triseriata feriarum

This species was originally found on S.I. It is an extremely small frog only reaching 1 3/8" (3.5 cm). This species is characterized by a light line along the upper lip and a dark stripe from snout to groin passing through eye. These frogs inhabited Staten Islands moist woodlands, swamps and wetlands. This species may still exist in very small pockets on Staten Island.  ANY SIGHTINGS OF THIS SPECIES SHOULD BE REPORTED TO THE NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION.