Audrey Freshman, ACSW; CASAC

Adjunct Professor

Marriage and Family Therapy

Audrey314@aol.com

 

 

Audrey Freshman is currently enrolled in the Doctoral Program in Clinical Social Work at NYU.  She holds a Masters in Social Work from Columbia University, which she received in 1979.  In 1975, she received her BA cum laude in Psychology at NYU.  In 1985 she became a credentialled alcoholism counselor (CAC) and in 1994 she also received her credential in substance abuse (CSAC) that has since been consolidated under the CASAC. Ms. Freshman lived in Mexico between 1975-1977. During that time, she taught developmentally disabled students and became bilingual in Spanish. 

 

Ms. Freshman is the Program Director at Tempo Group, Inc., an OASAS licensed outpatient non-profit substance abuse agency located in Nassau County.  Ms. Freshman joined Tempo in 1989 as the Coordinator of Family Services; a program that she designed, implemented and continues to coordinate. The family program offers assessment, education and treatment services to chemically dependent clients and their families. 

 

Ms. Freshman’s responsibilities include the clinical and administrative program development and management of all clinical components of the State licensed multi-phased, medically supervised agency.   Of particular note, Ms. Freshman has developed a computer program on Microsoft Access to integrate and track the clinical, fiscal and scheduling aspects of the agency operation.   In 1995, Ms. Freshman arranged for Tempo Group to become a “Provider Institution” for OASAS Academy of Addictive Studies.  She coordinates the staff development program that offers credentialling credits to staff and other professionals in the field of alcoholism and substance abuse.  Finally, Ms. Freshman has participated in numerous community, school and agency presentations on the topic of prevention and intervention in chemical dependency.

 

Ms. Freshman currently is the assistant editor for the Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions.  This peer review journal premiered in November 1, 2001. Ms. Freshman maintains a private practice located in Rockville Centre.  She is the Liaison for the Teen Network for JACS- Jewish Alcoholics, Chemically Dependent and Significant Others.    She is working on the implementation of an Addictive Studies Program for Hofstra University.

 

In 1985-1989, Ms. Freshman directed the Family Orientation Program at Lowell Institute. Lowell Institute utilized a structural family model in the treatment of chemical dependency, under the directorship of Jonathan Lampert, M.D. who was trained by Salvadore Minuchin, MD.  From 1979-1985, Ms. Freshman was a psychiatric social worker at the NYS Psychiatric Institute. 

 

 

 

Publications:

            Freshman, Audrey (accepted for publication).  Assessment and Treatment of Adolescent Substance Abusers.  In S.L.A. Straussner (Ed).  Clinical Work with Substance-Abusing Clients. New York: Guilford Press.

 

Freshman, Audrey & Utall, Maxine (2000/2001).  JACS: No cocktails in the Catskills. Viewpoint:  Putting All thePieces Together, 43 (2) National Council of Young Israel. 

 

Freshman, Audrey. (1995). The Chemical Dependent 'Child' Script: Will Peter Pan  Ever Grow Up?  In Joan D. Atwood (Ed) Family Scripts. Taylor & Francis, Inc.: Ind.

 

Freshman, Audrey. (Dec.1995). Is S/he or Isn't S/he? Family Denial of Substance Abuse In Early Adolescence". NY Association for Marriage and Family Therapy Newsletter. Albany, NY.

 

Freshman, Audrey and Leinwand, Cindy. (2001).  The Implications of Female Risk Factors for Substance Abuse Prevention in Adolescent Girls”. Journal of Prevention and Intervention in the Community.

            

Freshman, Audrey. Letters. “Coke Isn’t It.”  New York Magazine. September 22, 1997. P.8

 

Courses:

 

 

MFT 240 Family Therapy and Chemical Dependency 3 s.h.

 

Course Description:

This course provides an overview of chemical dependency and its systemic effect upon family roles and functions. It  utilizes a bio-psycho-social model of understanding of addiction in adolescence and adulthood and its concomitant family co-dependency issues.

 

Students learn about planned intervention, relapse prevention, 12-Step recovery, and alternative clinical management strategies of short/long-term family treatment goals.

 

Goals/Objectives:

 

·        Develop knowledge of licit and illicit substances and usage.

·        Describe the socio-cultural context of chemical usage in the United States.

·        Describe the differences in male and female patterns of chemical dependency.

·        The student will be able to evaluate and diagnose alcoholism/substance abuse.

·        The student will be able to diagnose co-dependency and describe its clinical manifestation as it appears in the child/parent/spouse role,

·        Planned Intervention strategies within the family and the workplace will be taught.

·        The role of the Self-Help Movement in recovery counseling will be explored.

·        Relapse Prevention strategies will be understood as it relates to the chemically dependent individual and the respective family members.

·        The student will be able to develop short/long term treatment goals for the chemically dependent individual and the family.

·        The student will be able to differentiate recovery-oriented psychotherapy from competing theoretical frameworks for working with addictions.

 

 

 

 


 MFT 247 Psychodynamics of Addiction:  Early Child and Adolescent Issues 3 s.h.

 

The psychodynamics of addiction will be presented utilizing a developmental model. The intra-personal determinants and inter-personnel theories – learning theory, resiliency and  risk factors will be presented.  The diagnosis of addictive disorder in adolescents and the interrelationship with learning disabilities; attention deficit disorder and  depression will be fostered.

 

 

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

Participants will gain insight and historical perspective concerning definitions and issues adolescence.

 

Objectives:

·      Define, compare and contrast views of adolescence from several professional perspectives

 

·      Identify and characterize cultural issues which impact on adolescent development

 

·      List and describe the primary issues affecting preadolescents and adolescents

 

·      Discuss the impact of alcohol and other drug abuse on specific developmental issues of adolescence

 

 

·        List and define risk factors, protective factors and resiliency.

·        Understand concepts related to increased risk and resiliency factors for psychoactive substance use disorders.

 

·        Describe and compare a range of levels of care and available services.

·        Outline and summarize current trends in adolescent’s AOD use, attitudes and substances of  choice, nationally and statewide.

 

·        Outline the steps in the assessment process and identify factors necessary for accurate assessment of adolescent AOD use.

 

·        Describe appropriate techniques and skills for assessing adolescent AOD use.

 

·        Compare and contrast at least three methods to help motivate an adolescent to change and/or

      to continue treatment.

 

·        Analyze data to determine appropriate treatment modalities for adolescents. 

 

·        Outline the steps in the assessment process and identify factors necessary for accurate assessment of adolescent AOD use.

 

·        Describe appropriate techniques and skills for assessing adolescent AOD use.

 

·        Compare and contrast at least three methods to help motivate an adolescent to change and/or

      to continue treatment.

 

·        Analyze data to determine appropriate treatment modalities for adolescents.